Episode 57. Shopping for Sewing

Recent shopping experience led Ada and Nicole to ponder just what is it about sales that gets them going. Plus, feedback from our last episode. Follow the pod at @AsianSewistCollective on Instagram. For show notes and a transcript of this episode, please see: https://asiansewistcollective.com/episode-57-shopping-for-sewing/  If you find our podcast informative and enjoy listening, you can support us by buying our limited edition merch, joining our monthly membership or making a one-time donation via Ko-Fi: https://ko-fi.com/asiansewistcollective 

Links

Blanca Flight Suit by Closet Core Patterns

KarishmaClimateGirl on Instagram

Morris and Sons – Fabric store

Fancy Tiger Crafts – Fabric store

Bisque Trousers by Vivian Shao Chen

Transcript

Nicole
Oh, let me just drink coffee

Sorry, you could have just kept going.

Ada
I really could have.

Welcome to the Asian Sewist collective podcast the Asian Sewist Collective is a group of Asian people from around the world brought together by our shared appreciation for fiber and textile arts, and our desire to see more Asian representation in the sewing community. 

Nicole  

In this podcast, we explore the intersection of our identities and our shared sewing practice as we create a space for Asian sewists and our allies. 

Ada   
I’m your co host, Ada Chen, and I’m recording from Denver, Colorado, Denver is the traditional territory of the US, Cheyenne and Arapaho peoples. I’m a Taiwanese American marketer turned entrepreneur and these days you’ll find me running my own natural skincare brand Erleia. That’s E-R-L-E-I-A. Find us on social media at ErleiaSkin. Most importantly, for this podcast, you can find my sewing @i.hope.sew on Instagram. 

Nicole  
And I’m your co host, Nicole, I’m recording from outside of Chicago, Illinois, the original homelands of the Council of the three fires, the Ojibwe, the Potawatomi, and the Odawa people. I’m a Philippine American lawyer who loves to sew and you can find me on Instagram at @NicoleAngelineSews. 

Ada
Okay, Nicole, it’s been a few weeks. Are you sewing anything currently working on anything?

Nicole
Let me just say that I I’m going to start something new. And don’t get too excited. It’s not that exciting. So right before we recorded I came I came from my first pole dancing class.

Ada
Oh, did you like it?

Nicole
I actually really loved it. I thought it was awesome. I. So the story is I signed up to do aerial hammock. So like, for listeners who aren’t familiar with that, it’s usually like a hanging piece of slightly stretchy cloth that hangs from the ceiling that’s in a loop and you do fun fancy dances as a kid like to try something new. inversions are not not your home girls. They were like, Oh, it’s okay. If you get dizzy. I’m like, Nah, girl, it’s acid reflux. You got anything for that? No, like, Oh, I’d never heard that. Like you’re clearly not old enough then. Okay. So, I talked to the instructor and she said, you know, you’d really like I think you’d like our pole series. And so it’s a three week introductory series. And today it was the first day and it was a lot of fun. But you are encouraged to use kneepads. and I are like I’ve learned today why and so I borrowed a pair, there’s, and before I left, I just bought a pair, I’m like, yeah I can get from anywhere, or I can buy it from this independent studio. But as I was coming home, I’m like, I’m gonna forget these every single class I know, I’m going to like they’re just going to be somewhere and I’m going to forget them. So my plan to make, this just came about half hour ago, is I’m going to make a mesh pouch. I made them a lot like I’ve got a lot of like plain white. I don’t know what it’s made out of not like made probably nylon, probably something like that. But I’ve made a lot of wash bags. And yeah, so recently, I made a set of reusable, like makeup remover, things that are terrycloth on one side and flannel on the other and I made a wash bag for my girlfriends to like put them in. really cute. And then I also made big, like, wash bags with zippers on them for sweaters and stuff that, I ain’t about to hand wash those, so I know I know. But I don’t wash them that often so it’s fine. Someone’s gonna write in saying “you shouldn’t do that”. I mean, you are welcome to give feedback.

If you’re hand washing all of your sweaters and this, No, not me or Nicole but good for you. I totally understand it I understand the science of the fibers but washbags.

I do it sometimes.

Ada
Yeah.

Nicole
I do sometimes but and then so what I’m going to do is I’m going to make a mesh bag probably just a drawstring one so I can slide the the knee pads which are just as black like slip on ones the exact ones I wore at the thing but then I was like maybe I’ll just make a cute like pouch for them and something that is you know pattern and loud which is you know I’m come on you know we’re talking to you. So I’m sure I have scraps of like outdoor fabric when I bought a remnant at some point and I just because I just don’t want to forget them at home. So I want to create some sort of pouch so the I think I will probably do just a drawstring for the inner mesh so that I can wash them and like you know, they’re gonna get funky It’s just what’s gonna happen. And then probably some kind of zipper pouch or maybe I don’t know, or like a maybe a drawstring, I don’t know like a drawstring pouch. What do you think would be like?

Ada
I think a drawstring is fine. Zippers are fine, too.

Nicole
Yeah, I mean, honestly, whenever I make a drawstring bag, I get confused. I’m like, Wait, why is this edge raw? Like there’s more folds, I’m like, it’s, this is easy, it’s fine. And then there’s more folds than I think it’s going to. So all that is to say, I am really enjoying pole class. It’s one of one to three intro and I’m hoping to like continue to do that. And I will be making like a little kneepad bag, so I don’t forget it. Because I don’t I don’t carry like a gym bag because I usually just go there and back. So I could throw it in a tote bag or whatever. I’m very much like if I don’t have to carry anything I won’t. So I’ll make it something I don’t know, bright and fun. And it’ll encourage me to not forget it. So that’s, that’s what I’m working on right now. No, no, that’s not what I’m working on right now. I thought about it 30 minutes ago, it will be what I’m working on today. What about you any pole dancing related sewing you’re doing?

Ada
I have actually a few friends who do pole dancing and you will have rock hard core at the end of this or you know a few more classes and I cannot personally achieve and I also really like my knees. So I I understand the kneepads and I understand making a pouch for it. I am also making some pouches actually. So I have two printed like quilting cotton’s kind of one of them’s definitely a quilting cotton. And when I tell you about the pattern you’re gonna understand. The other one I think is actually probably a shirting cotton that was just repurposed. That one I got because my friend for her wedding favors I think I might have told you about this, she wrapped them in fabric. And it was kind of like the Japanese style of like Furoshiki where you use the fabric is wrapping it’s just a square, it was actually like it had a little blind hem, which was cute. But I cut it up, didn’t get rid of the hem didn’t unpick that cut it up, I’m turning it into a tote bag for her and like a little drawstring pouch because it was a perfect square. So it cut out straps and was like I still have one more rectangle piece here. And I thought it’d be nice to just send to her because I know you know, it’s hard when you do a destination wedding running, you know all over the place to bring things back and forth and I personally don’t need more fabric. So I will be very happy to finish that off and send it to her. The other one that I’m making is also tote bags out of this. I’m looking at it now space cats is the best way to summarize this fabric.

Nicole
Okay

Ada
floating illustrated cats in space.

Nicole
Sure,

Ada
Planet stars. My other friend actually gifted this to me because her friend had gifted it to her. And I taught her how to sew. And her friend is actually like a production seller. So asked for a large outdoors wear brand. I will not name so they don’t get in trouble. But they just had some extra cool prints and gave it to her. She was like when am I ever gonna make anything with this, you take it and I’ve been meaning to send her at least a tote bag for her and a tote bag for her friend out of this fabric for about a year now. So since I was doing the other tote bag, it’s on the table with them. And I also just spent last night cutting out a pattern the first pattern of cut out in a very long time.

Nicole
A paper pattern?

Ada
A PDF pattern that I had to take together it was 59 pages.

Nicole
Oh

Ada
Yeah, I wanted there so bad to be projector files. I was like it would be so great. No, they don’t have projector files. This pattern has been around a while is the Closet Core Blanca flightsuit. So you know in jumpsuit, I have purchased some new brand color green fabric and all sorts of different ways that you saw some of them and I’m looking at this twill that I got from Blackbird fabrics. But Closet Core is very staunchly like pro make a toile. So I guess I’m making a toile at some point and then hopefully by the time you hear this episode, I will be wearing my green boilersuit jumpsuit flightsuit for my tradeshow event.

Nicole
You know. Uh, yeah, I think with the flightsuit you’d probably want to do a toile.

Ada
Yeah.

Nicole
I’m trying to get, at least my brain wrapped around it because there’s so many different like, I don’t want to do I don’t want to make toiles but I think I’m going to start doing at least a little bit. But I have never wanted a flight suit. I was like, oh, like an electrician. And then I saw Barbie. I was like

Ada
Now you want a pink one?

Nicole
I do. I do. I just I mean I don’t think other people are so I should say I don’t think other people look bad. Like I actually think it looks really great on some people and a lot of people but I can’t imagine myself in it without feeling like a tradesperson which again no shame to tradespeople is Just like not something I envisioned, but then I saw Barbie and I was like, oh boy,

Ada
I think we all saw Barbie boiler suits, flight suits, however you want to call them have been making a bit of a comeback in terms of like corporate branding, from what I’ve seen, like lots of people are having employees or temp agency People wear them for their like brand and like brand, the pocket or whatever, which is something I’m considering. But yeah, I think it’s come back in the last like year or two. I know this pattern is a bit older than that. But also, I saw a fantastic post Superbowl meme about Jason Kelce. Wearing I guess he was like shirtless at a game before and people made fun of him for being the shirtless drunk guy. And then at the Superbowl after party, he was in Kansas City Chiefs, colored overalls. And then a meme went around that was like, Oh, his wife put him in that because have you ever met a toddler? Like it’s impossible to take off? Exactly. That’s that’s my thought process of like, the only problem with flight suits, jumpsuits. Overalls is it’s just there’s so many more steps to go into the bathroom.

Nicole
Yeah, yeah, for sure. Toddlers, they, they might not need to take the clothes off to go to the bathroom.

Ada
If you got a diaper, which also some people might be adults. Yeah. But yeah, that’s, that’s everything that’s on my table plus some fabric that’s getting ironed post pre wash.

Nicole
So, listeners, if you’re like me, you have no idea who Ada was talking about.

Ada
It’s Taylor Swift’s boyfriend’s brother.

Nicole
Okay. Okay. I was like, I don’t know, sports things.

Ada
I only recently learned of them.

Nicole
Okay. I think I only know the last name because of Taylor Swift. And I’m like, okay, okay. But well, that sounds like fun. I’m looking forward to seeing the final product. And I really do. I loved that pink. I think it has to be pink for me if I ever do flightsuit. So, listeners, I’ll let you know.

Ada
Maybe I’ll do a pattern review in the next one.

Nicole
I love to hear it. I would not be taping 59 pages, though. So is there an AO file?

Ada
There is there’s a copy shop file. So I guess you could technically figure that out on your projector. But I was not feeling I was like what’s going to be the fastest, most efficient way?

Nicole
Sometimes I don’t mind. Taping and cutting and taping but 59 pages is a lot. That’s when I become allergic to them. Like, like Lisa from Black Women Stitch.

Ada
Like Lisa.

Okay, we’ve got some feedback.

Nicole
Yeah, let’s go ahead and share it with you all. So thank you so much, Colleen for sending in an email about our last episode. So our last episode was our first episode of 2024, where Ada and I talked about the changes that we’re going that the podcast is undergoing as well as you know what we did over the holiday season in our fabric haul episode. So Colleen wrote in with a really thoughtful email and I wanted to share it with you all. So Colleen says “Fiber Hauls are tough and I hope you’re not getting too many nitpicking emails about your purchases.” This is me . You’re not nitpicking. It’s great to hear feedback always. Colleen says “I send these comments with love and in the spirit of sharing things with people who like to learn slash know more about what they’re buying. Cashmere I learned recently is produced by combing it, it seems like painfully from cashmere goats which are native to Asia. I learned this from at the @karishmaclimategirl. So k-a-r-i-s-h-m-a climate girl on Instagram, who would also make a great future podcast guest.” So thanks for the recommendation. Colleen, back to Colleen: “There are a lot of different considerations regarding the ethics of cashmere from the environmental animal welfare, welfare and human welfare side of things I thought it could make for an interesting deep dive sort of episode about the Asian fiber.” So I’m going to pause there. Thank you again for sending this this is in relation to one of my cashmere silk blends I think that we talked about that I had gotten for Morris and Sons in Melbourne, Australia. And I just for some background, you know, I haven’t bought bought cashmere new before. I have one or two cashmere sweaters that I have purchased through secondhand and thrifting and I only recently started to get into it So Ada I’d like to hear your impressions on cashmere. For me, I always thought it was like a luxury thing like rich folks have cashmere that lasts a lifetime. I haven’t you know, all that, but I didn’t really think about much about what it was like, you know, to source it. And I was just like, oh, cashmere fancy, which you probably heard in our last episode. But yeah, what are your associations with cashmere?

Ada
I also used to think that cashmere was pretty fancy because you know, cashmere sweaters very expensive, then I think what has happened in mostly, I don’t want to say exclusively a fast fashion but like the your run of the mill like Uniqlo of the world that kind of not a Uniqlo. Now, definitely fast fashion. But like a step above, maybe like the Forever 21s and the Sheins of the world, the what they’ve started doing. And then what a lot of startups started doing is actually selling cashmere blends, as just not saying in the title of the item, like what the blend was, but saying like, what had 1% cashmere in it. So it’s a cashmere sweater, and all this stuff to kind of like, build off of that cache. What I understand is that that also came from wanting to kind of make the fiber itself more accessible. But I do know, I did know that it came from a goat. And I think that there’s been quite a lot of back and forth more in the recent years about like, how ethical is it to comb it from the goat? And How sustainable is it compared to like a Merino, or like other wool fiber?

Nicole
So yeah, that’s more than I knew.

Ada
Who goes around looking in tags though, like, what’s your fiber content?

Nicole
Well, I’m not I’m not. I’m not gonna say weirdo. I’m that I’m that person. Now. You know, weird for doing that. I do that I do that now as well. And, you know, I had shared with Colleen I’ve written her back and I didn’t know anything about cashmere and I was like, Okay, well, I would like to invest in something a sweater not sewing. And I you know, I did some research and I found a couple of companies that were self proclaimed. So, you know, cautionary self proclaimed sustainable and cruelty free but I never ended up actually purchasing any of them. So I only thrifted like I said the cashmere sweaters which you know, secondhand is almost always more sustainable than the new I’m as long as it’s thoughtfully purchased. It’s at our but and then the fabric that I purchased. So, you know, listeners, we’d love to hear from you about what your associations are with cashmere. You know, do you want us to do a deep dive episode and if you do you know, if you have any ideas or resources or you want to help us research cashmere, send us a message at asiansewistcollective@gmail.com We’d love to get the episode out for you this year, I think it’d be really interesting to dive into it. But we could definitely use some assistance, but we’ll see if we can get to it as a topic. But thank you so much Colleen for submitting it. I think I’m interested in now and in looking into it more and I’ll definitely be checking out @karishmaclimategirl on Instagram. And we’ll put a link to that in the show to her profile in the show notes and maybe any cursory resources that we find now. Thank you so much again, Colleen for your email. We love hearing from our listeners. And we have and we will respond to Colleen via email as well. We really appreciate you.

Do you love this podcast? Do you like personalizing your sewing projects with sewing labels? Do you know someone who loves personalizing their projects with these labels? Or do you know someone who just loves sewing? If the answer is yes to any of those questions, please check out the Asian Sewist Collective sewing label collection. New for the season is a sustainability set. Our very own producer and artists Mariko Abe designed these just for you with sayings like lovingly rescued fibers and I’m 50 and I know it these labels will be a perfect gift for your sewing friends and family and of course for you. We also have our original collection of labels up on our coffee page to purchase please go to ko-fi.com/asiansewistcollective. Your purchase goes towards helping this all volunteer podcast keep going by helping with things like editing transcripts and publishing your support is greatly appreciated

Ada
Okay, so we’ve got an interesting fun topic today we’re talking about closing sales specifically like craft and fabric stores but let’s before we get into closing sales talk about fabric sales in general because I feel like they are a hot topic on sew-stagram, and the sewing community.

Nicole
you know, I love a good sale. I we’ve probably talked about it in the past and to my detriment I think you know, when I say to my detriment, I mean to my mental health to an extent because I end up just getting a lot of stuff. I feel like I don’t need. And to my wallet Uh, and, you know, so just backing up like, a couple dozen years, like, you know, I grew up with sales. So growing up, we didn’t have, we didn’t have a ton of money, we had a lot of people in our household and so, and my grandmother on my mom’s side, my paternal grandmother, so thrifty is what she would like to call herself. Like, like, almost like, Stingy. I don’t know what the right word is. But you know, like, now I’d be like, No, she’s smart. But you know, like looking for sales. And there was always this like gratification when when she was able to, and my mom, by extension, like, pick something up for less money. For us, it was a necessity, right? It was like, we have a big household. stuff has to go far. But then as I got older, that didn’t, the buying, the desire to buy something that’s on sale lingered, but the income grew and the need shrank, if that makes sense.

Ada
Yeah.

Nicole
Like, so I don’t know. It’s, it changed. I now as an adult with my own income. And you know, we’re a dual income household. I’m starting to change the way that I see sales and buying, I get sucked into it so much still, I do. And sometimes I go on tears where I’m just like, Ooh, let’s just get this. This is great. But yeah, I think fabric sales in particular have led me down like fabric discounts fabric sales, have led me to this point where I have, I have a stash, but I’ve stash like Not, not like, not another small one. It’s definitely overwhelming and unmanageable. And I am this weekend, going to look at making donations intentional, like a mindful donations. So one, two, a fabric sale for the Apparel Industry Board in Chicago. And the other one would be to this organization that I talked about, where they have a Sewing Studio, and I get to do more like quilting cotton stuff, house stuff there, and then apparel fabric and stuff to the other place. But anyway, so I mean, what’s your relationship with shopping and shopping sales in general?

Ada
I too, grew up going shopping sales. sale rack first, all right, like the basement of our Macy’s, always with this long sale rack that would go across like the whole room. That’s where we got like all of our clothes. Then it became I think the sale rack at the Gap, which is very similar, like a long rack. And then you get like the, you know, little price tags, and you’re doing some math. So yeah, I think, you know, we weren’t I would say that our economic status as a household growing up, fluctuated. And so there were good times, and there were not so good times. And so, you know, you just got used to chopping the sales. I think I learned about there’s a blog called crazy coupon lady. She’s still around, I think.

Nicole
Okay, yeah,

Ada
Great SEO. Like, if you Google, like, whatever store sale, I think that website comes up first. But um, they were probably some of the first people on the internet to be posting about like, a CVS haul with, you know, all the coupons. And like, you would see on like, morning shows before school, like, all these people with these crazy deals, like, their receipt would be 10 feet long. They would have paid like 20 cents for like, all the stuff. And so it was really interesting, kind of not necessarily needing to do that. But like being like, Okay, that’s interesting. Like, that’s how you can stretch $1 So I definitely still get very swept up by sale and I have to catch myself now. Because similarly, like, we don’t have to, but I’m always like, ooh, if it’s on sale, even if it’s like this vegetables 30 cents per pound off. I’m like in my head I’m like, that’s 10% let’s go for bok choy or whatever. So yeah, I I definitely get sucked into sales a lot. I also know that like most people, a lot of people do. And it’s been really interesting kind of on the other side of things like selling things on the internet as my primary source of income now, if people are some people were like, Whatever, I’ll buy it. I don’t care what the price and then some people are more budget conscious. And so like I did a mystery box sale that you participated in.

Nicole
I love a mystery box.

Ada
You love a mystery box. And it turns out that the breakdown I thought it was going to be all returning people who like knew their products knew their favorites knew that if they left me a note, I would probably do my best to fulfill their requests with whatever stock I had. But I actually got quite a few people who are like new to the brand who said, I just love I love a good deal. And this was a great way to try it out. Thanks for offering this. And I was like oh like I didn’t. I personally try to keep my prices like what I think are reasonable, because I’ve been the person who had to save to go to Sephora to buy something. And so I don’t think that’s like, I think that you can get quality, I know that you can get quality ingredients and quality products at like most price points. But um, I personally don’t think that my prices are too high, because there’s a lot of labor and r&d and design and honestly, like really expensive ingredients going. But like, for some people, it is expensive, like $20 for a lotion bar could be expensive, so I totally get it. And I was like pleasantly surprised by the number of folks who left me you know, who were like, I’m new, and I’ve been following you. But I wanted to like wait for an opportunity to try. So I hope all those people are enjoying other boxes. Because, yeah, it was it was really interesting to see, like, what the breakdown was of who takes advantage of a sale.

Nicole
So I wonder if it’s an a uniquely American thing.

Ada
Maybe.

Nicole
In terms of, you know, companies, big box companies, large companies, I think, you know, they are going to expect to that people are going to buy things for sale. And I asked that question, I don’t have an answer, you know, Ada share your reflections. And listeners, same share your reflections when, if you have any with regard to you know, the American culture, North American culture versus other places in the world. But I remember, listeners, my husband, Michael is English. So he moved here about 10 years ago, for me because he loves me. And when he first moved here, sales themselves were just like a novelty. In England, like there was nothing that was ever when he growing up. And I think maybe that’s changed now. But you know, there wasn’t Black Friday, there’s black friday now. But like at a clothing store, you’d get 10% off. Ooh, and like 10% off is like tax in Chicago, but okay. And so, I remember earlier in our relationship, I would get something you know, I don’t know, Bed Bath and Beyond or no, but uh, yeah, probably Bed Bath and Beyond bathroom, buddy. Yeah. And I’m like, Oh, I have this coupon. Let’s go check it out. And he’s like, or you could save money by not buying anything at all that you don’t need. And I was like, shut up. I really remember that. One of the conversations that we had was like, oh, yeah, I’ve got this $5 reward. I’d like to check out stuff. And he’s like, but if you don’t need anything, you don’t have to spend any money. Like it’s not a you know, and I was like, I’ll just check it out. But I mean, he’s been in America for 11 years now. So it’s a little bit different. And he does like his Kohl’s cash. But I just remember early on, and I do think about that, because that’s part of my internal dialogue is like, do I really need this? But that dialogue is not constant? Like it should be. But but it’s not. I mean, I don’t know. Have you? Do you have any observations about America slash North America versus shopping and other cultures and places?

Ada
It’s really funny, because as you were saying this, when I came into the episode, I was like, I don’t know, you just chopped it off. And then I realized that, I don’t know if this is like a thing other places. But in North America, in most of like, I would say, like, even in the UK, and Australia, so like, primarily English speaking countries, when you see a sale sign it’s like, 20% off, 30% off, 50% off, right. So in your head, when you’re doing the math, like say it’s $100 20% off is 20% of that. So you’re like 100 minus 20% $20, which is so I pay 80. I think I learned this in high school. But in Chinese, is when you see a sale sign, it’ll say like, dah ba-zuh. So what that means, like, it is 20% off, but actually the number they’re referring to is the 80% that you’re paying. So it’ll be like, we’re taking, like, here’s the amount that you’re actually paying, instead of like 20% off, it’ll say you’re paying 80% So when you read sale signs, it’s like you have to like inverse the math, sometimes when you’re reading them, at least I do, you know, like just.

Nicole
Yeah.

Ada
Code Switching context switching completely language switching. And I think now it for me, it’s like very, it’s something I’m very used to, like I understand. But I remember learning about that, I think in high school and Chinese school and being like, What do you mean? That makes no sense? Why would somebody want to calculate the price that they’re gonna pay? Why would you just tell them the discount on the sign because then, you know, here we think the bigger the sale percentage, the better right? Like 70% off is better than 50% off. But there you would have, you would want a lower number, right? Because you would want it to say like you’re paying 30% and versus like you’re paying 50%

Nicole
Why would you want, so I’m processing all of this. Why would you want? So what’s the appeal in the Chinese culture? Or in the language of seeing the bigger number? Like, what’s more attractive?

Ada
The lower number is more attractive. Because instead of saying it’s X percent off, they’re saying, it’s this much percent that you’re paying.

Nicole
Yeah.

Ada
So it’s like the inverse number that they’re saying. So you want them to be saying, Oh, you’re paying 30% instead of 70%? off.

Nicole
So you see, you’re paying 10%. And you’re like, Oh, yay, that’s great.

Ada
But here, yeah, like, if you see a one, like they don’t do the, they, they mostly do it in like increments of 10. But I’ve seen like, the youth the more specific percentages in like, you know, increments of five, but it’ll be like, Oh, you’re paying 10% instead of 90% off.

Nicole
Right.

Ada
And so it’s just like, I was like, oh, right, that’s the thing, and then having to calculate The math back. Interesting, I don’t know, that’s, that’s my cross cultural experience with sales. I don’t know if anyone else has experienced something similar, where they’re trying to shop for things. And they’re like, suddenly, like, I don’t understand why the socks are this price.

Nicole
I get really excited about my 90% off deals get to the register. And they’d be like, Oh, you’re paying me it’s only 10% off. And I I can see that happening. But you know, back to sort of the psychology of sales. I mean, like, what is it about a sale that like, makes us want to buy? I think something something that I was thinking about earlier? It’s like the the necessity versus the desire? Like we don’t, most people know, I shouldn’t say that. I should say that, like a lot of people. We don’t We rarely shop for true necessity. Like we have, you know, people who are who are privileged enough to move beyond necessity, you know, but we they feel like they need things, is it because they’re on sale, or because they actually need it. I mean, what drives you to be excited about a sale?

Ada
Oh, I don’t know, I feel like sometimes it’s just the thrill of a good find. And if the thrill of good deal, like feeling like you got an extra good deal out of something, versus paying full price, or even like getting a smaller discount. At least that’s like, I think that’s been my personal satisfaction when I shop for sales. But like now, I’m in a place where I can go to let’s say, like a craft fair or Maker’s Market and not be like, $200 for a sweater, oh my God. Because I’d fully understand the work that went into that sweater, and it probably does cost more than $200 and B, I have the means right? To afford it and not try to haggle it down. And so I think part of it is like, feeling like you got a good deal. And and part of its like under understanding the true value and almost like the utility value of a product or a good to including fabric, right?

Nicole
Yeah. And I think about how, how sewing has changed my perspective on this and like you said, the understanding the value of a product, like I see something for that’s five bucks, and I’m like, cannot be there. Like that cannot be a product where someone wasn’t exploited, you know, and again, so just like back up 10 feet, like, I’m not this is no judgment. This is about people who shop sales, I do it. It’s more just like an explanation about why we decided to do it. And, you know, I think about turning to sewing as a practice and like sales allowed me to break into sewing at lower price points at Joann which is like, you know, where I started and the only in person store that’s like, you know, within, like, I live outside of Chicago, so, you know, not as many options here. And I wasn’t buying everything, I wasn’t buying things full price. So because I was trying stuff out and it allowed me to be exploration explorative that’s not a word. Leave it in, it’s fine. You know, it allowed me to explore the craft in a way that wasn’t that was friendly to me. Everything at the time was also a mail order. So that was a challenge was you know, March 2020. But it was helpful in that way and it’s helpful as you know, fabric sales, fabric sales less than like notion sales because sales involving notions because you know, you go through those fabric because it’s the main adornment. I got so wrapped up in the intersection between like the sales and a growing stash. I have I just have too much like I said earlier and, you know, I am in a, I’m in a no buy fabric zone right now, my brain just because I have too much. And I also realized that having too much for me, has led me to devalue what I do have. And so I want to go back in and say, Okay, well, what’s missing? Like, what do I really like, you know, stuff that I bought early on when I first started sewing is is number one all quilting cotton. So what was I gonna do? Yeah, that’s not my jam. Someone can make quilts from these. Once I find, once I donate them responsibly, you know, or just, we all change our styles change as we as we mature as people. And I don’t think that my style when I first started is the same as now I got wrapped up in trends. And so when I got, you know, the, the $1.99 and $5.99 pattern sales, I am also donating like 100 or so of those. I think in the last episode, I’d mentioned that I was like, really needing a TNT. So maybe again, this TNT episode might happen in 2024. But, yeah, I get I get wrapped up in the sales, and then I rack up stuff, and I don’t have the space for it. But even if I did, the space wouldn’t really help me actually, as make my way through the stuff appreciate, you know, all of the material and ultimately put it towards something that I love. And so, for me sales, they are, there are some things in this world that are truly dangerous. I get that. But they’re dangerous for me, because then I’ll just like it’s spirals. And I realized that the latter half is going to be talking about two of our experiences with recent closing, closing sales. But I like to think that I was a little bit more mindful during that experience. But yeah, I don’t know, I just want to be more conscious. And it’s hard to not, like, get sucked in to a sales like, I just saw another small like a, unfortunately, a small business, but you know, deciding to close their doors. And I was like, Oh, let me check out the sale. And I was like, Oh, I know, you know, because in my head, especially if it’s a small business, I’m like, Okay, well, that sucks. I know that this person probably put a ton of work into it. They’re closing down, maybe I can help them out, especially if I find something that I love. But then I was like, but that’s not a real reason for me to add something in a place where I’m not in a place to add something. So I don’t know how are you like, with your fabric buying or even just like sewing related buying, like how you navigate sort of this commercialized consumerist sale world that we are in.

Ada
I also find it difficult. I’m trying now I’m not in a complete no buy. But I’m only in a “I’m going to I have to really love it and know exactly what I’m going to be using it for” type mood to buy something, which, you know, I broke a little bit of that rule. And we’ll talk about it in a bit at the last closingn sale I went to but I have filled the I have cubbies underneath my fabric cutting table. And that’s how I store my stash. And I’ve basically filled I think most of them, I still have an overflow bin as well. And then I haven’t been that I actually cleared out my stash last year, when I started teaching classes. And I pulled out a bunch of fabrics that I was like, I’m probably not going to use this. So if I put it in this bin, and it’s open for class use, like, that’s fine, too. What I’m finding now is that like, we haven’t even scratched the surface. I can probably put that fabric to better use. But yeah, I I am trying to be, I think when I first started getting into sewing, I was very caught up in the like, oh, once a year, like all the fabric stores online have a sale of Black Friday.

Nicole
Oh yeah.

Ada
And I did like my big haul. And then they would do like another one like six months from then I would probably do another haul. I’ve gotten mostly out of that cycle, I think and I’m truly waiting to be excited by the stuff that I get that’s new because there’s so much fabric that I bought that I’m like, I’m so excited to make this thing I just haven’t had the time to make it yet that I’m at that point where it’s like if you just keep adding to it and not actually sewing it then like what is the point you’re just accumulating to accumulate. I also you know, having volunteered at creative reuse stores and sourcing most of my fabric there. It’s interesting just seeing like the other side of it of like, you know if you can no longer sew for whatever reason, and your stash ends up somewhere else like this is how much waste we’re almost creating in the world by by this endless buying of fabric and it’s something that does come up a lot when I’m teaching classes, especially the upcycling class that I teach, like we’ll talk about who made your clothes where did they come from who made the clothes or are things that you’re trying to upcycle right now? Why are we trying to do that, and, you know, was there extra exploitation involved in, you know how this Target t shirt ended up in this pile. And so I think it’s really eye opening for a lot of people, because in every single class, I will tell them like, it is not cheaper to sew your own clothes, except for maybe bras if you need a well fitting bra. And you have the time and patience to do that. And I just like, have, like, I’m happy to explain to you the breakdown of costs, and talk to you about like labor and sewing and all the skills that you’re learning right now. But like, I’m just gonna make it abundantly clear, this is an expensive hobby. And there are ways to get into it that are more cost friendly, that we can talk about, like thrifting, or sales, but here you go. And for the most part, I think people have a positive reception to it. And it’s something that like, was important for me and my friend who runs the workshop space, like for us to communicate, right, and as two women of color who know how to sew, like, we were like, we want to communicate to our mostly white audience in Denver, that if you are buying these clothes, some like this is where it’s coming from the Global South. And this is like, where the fabrics coming from all these things. And yeah, we try to make sure that they understand like, if you’re paying $5, like you said, some somewhere along the line, something exploitation probably happen. If you feel like you got a good deal, or if that’s all you can afford. So be it. But you like you cannot come into our space and like, devalue this work and this material? Because I have had some people be like, Oh, that’s like, $5 I’m like, actually, like these pants. Hate to break it to you probably cost like $200 $300 if you wanted to make a pair of these.

Nicole
Right? Yeah. Yeah, it’s so interesting, I think just the way that sewing has really changed the way that I see shopping and consumerism and again I’m not at all perfect. Just these are things I think about. I don’t always act on them, you know, because I had some body changes and like, I gained weight and like, I need clothes that fit. Like now? So I you know, I went thrifting and then I couldn’t find what I wanted. And then I went shopping but but yeah, okay, so just, you know, fabric sales, purchasing, buying in general. You know, I think the the meat of the episode was actually going to be more contained. But I mean, in shorter, because we’re already at like, what, 50 minutes?

Ada
Sorry, listeners, we were in a bit of a ramble today.

Nicole
Yeah, I think it’s just interesting to talk about, you know, our buying habits. And again, just emphasize like, you know, we as sewists, our crafts are personal and how we see things Ada and I we just are both in a space where we’re trying to be more intentional and conscious about building our stash. And you know, guess what, I’m gonna slip at some point, like, I’m gonna be like, oh, I want this and I’ll see a sale. And I’m going to try really hard not to but you know, I acknowledge that. This is something that like, I’m working on changing so. But the reason why this topic came up is because at some point like a few months ago, a few weeks ago, the there was a Joann that I had gone to in the past not not really close to my home right now. But that announced it was closing I think I just got an email and then just wanted to like just talk about going to this closing sale. It’s this Joann is located across the street from my wedding venue.

Ada
Oh

Nicole
Yeah. And so there’s a little bit of a tie there because you know, the morning of my wedding, we we it was a January wedding. So we were in a hotel and we the hotel, we had a bus from the hotel to the to the place where we got married. We did the marriage and the ceremony and the reception in one room just because we’re like, it’s January. We don’t want anyone to go anywhere. And we’re getting ready. And someone was like, I was fully in my dress. Where’s your where’s your garter? Like My what now? Like, I don’t what? No, your garter it’s a thing you know, that. I know about at least in Western weddings, like you know, that says the elasticy thing that you put on your leg and like you through it and whatever during the wedding. And it’s just an all the wedding planning. I was like, I don’t know. I did not even think about it. So then my brother in law just went to that Joann fabrics from the wedding. Like just, like just bought one. Hopefully had a coupon? I don’t know. But yeah, and that was it. And I was like, Well, I don’t really care because I’m not keeping this. So here you go. And of tossing it during the reception. So anyway, that’s the Joann and then we’re closing and whenever someone announces the closing sale, I’m always a little bit like, oh, man, what a bummer. You know, first my first inkling is my first thought is always like jobs. You know, like oh, man, these people are going to need new jobs and then if it’s small business you know like Ah man, like this owner put in all that and you know, it’s going away. And I think that I went there originally just right at the beginning of the closing sale, and I told myself I was like, I’m just gonna look at stuff that like normally isn’t on sale. And I would go and get out and I’ll just pick that up. So I actually ended up picking up books.

Ada
Oh!

Nicole
Yeah, it was one was a…at this point it was only 50% off. But books never go on sale. So like one was a National Parks coloring book that I got for my brother. He loves National Parks gave it to him for his birthday. He’s like I don’t really color like I know, but you National Parks. But he actually really likes it. He’s just like learning about the stuff that’s in there. And then I got my niece like a sticker by numbers book and my husband a Dungeons and Dragons cookbook because he’s really into Dungeons and Dragons. And you know, it’s like, Okay, that’s it. And then I got an email saying it’s closing like tomorrow, several weeks later. And I was like, Alright, fine, I’ll just see, you know, like, I don’t know, there’s probably going to be nothing there. And there was still a lot that was left. They were people were actually tearing down like, displays, people that worked there and that were working on converting the store, not just like people were running in and running amok. But yeah, there was still a lot there, there was a lot of fabric and and you know, the buttons and stuff. And at first I was like, Well, I’m going to look for notions, I’m going to look for stuff that you know, is not fabric because I don’t need fabric and I still don’t need fabric. And I ended up getting like a lot of basic buttons. You know, like I love buttons, you know, I got lots of really cute indie buttons and like sets of them and they’re super cute. But then sometimes you just need a basic B plastic button or whatever. Like for my husband shirts, he’s not going to care about a sparkly heart shape, or whatever shape button. So I picked up some of those. I went to the zipper section. There were some zippers left, I picked up some of those. They’re still like random thread’s on sale. So I picked up some of those, like it ended up being I was one of those crazy coupon ladies that had a really long receipt that you referred to earlier. I was like, whoa. But, and it was really, you know, inexpensive. But it’s stuff that I know that will get used. Because it’s it’s like, I’m always going to need zippers, I’m always going to need it like I’ve never zippers is one of those things that I don’t I have not bought full price because I thrift them. Or like I got them at Joann and it was hard not to just pick up everything under the sun that I felt like I needed. And I think it’s I think he came out the people that worked there. And when I got to the register, know, oh, hi, how are you doing? And I said, I you know, I just said okay, you know, like, how’s your weekend going? You know, it’s it’s a big weekend. And she’s like, thank you so much for asking. And and I’m like, Oh no, we’re these people being treated like crap, like during the closing sale. And so I’m just like, even you just remember when you’re out in public and you’re working with people that the like, you know, customer service people especially they often do not get treated well. So, so be nice. But yeah, the the closing sale was a good place to stock up on stuff when you could find it. But I could also see Oh, I did buy something that I didn’t. So back to sort of the beginning of everything. You know, when I said like sales allowed me to sort of enter into the sewing space at a price point that like made sense for someone trying to think I bought some candle oils because my mom was recently into making candles. Did we talk about this last season?.

Ada
No. Embracing that retirement hobby.

Nicole
She loves it. She loves it. So, just a side note why not. She I’d suggested Why don’t you try making candles for my grandma’s 90th birthday than 93rd birthday party. And she’s like, okay, you know, and then she’s at home just trying it and you know, I gave her some of my essential oils, like I ordered some wax for her. And then she got COVID So she was like, do these candles smell like anything? And I’m like, kinda like she couldn’t be… Yeah. Are you sure we didn’t talk about stinky candles? I don’t know. Maybe we did. But I bought I bought some of the Joann brand like candle oil, like Fragrance Oil and stuff. So and that was something like I’ve always wanted to try it and I’m like, Okay, well, this is a good opportunity. And I didn’t buy like 20 bottles. I was just like, I bought a couple and I was like, Okay, we’ll try it. So I think you know, it’s, it’s a bummer when this stuff happens but it’s an opportunity for you to stock up on what you might need and then to try new things. It’s also an opportunity for you to like go ham and like buy everything under the sun which is which is like hard not to do for me but I tried to be like intentional about it and you just Have you just experienced like a closing moving sale? Right?

Ada
Yeah, I think definitely the, maybe the opposite end of the spectrum. So if you’re on sewing Instagram at all, you probably have heard about Fancy Tiger Crafts. They are my local indie craft store, mostly primarily like fiber arts, textiles. And they close to their main location where they had been, I think, almost since the beginning so over 10 years on Broadway in Denver, and moved further down technically the same street Broadway to the next town over in Englewood. And it’s a different size space, it’s definitely I think they like readjusted their business model more to focus on their online sales and their classes. Because they had a fairly large space down not downtown, but like on Broadway, which is like one of our main kind of hipster shopping areas like the Goodwill on that street a few blocks down from where they were is well known by a lot of people for the good and the bad. There’s some cute cafes I have some friends who do you know own stores on that road, like road street? and it’s a pretty nice neighborhood, but it’s definitely like an expensive neighborhood to be in as a business. So they did a closing sale to clear out not only their stock that they had, that they weren’t bringing over I guess or you know, had too much of but also other fixtures. So that was what I was going to ask you because I know Lisa from Black Women Stitch has had some of those patterns from past sales, like did your Joanne’s closing sale and not have any pattern juries like I’m not seeing

Nicole
any there were there were fixtures yeah fixed all the fixtures were for sale I had I considered I don’t I considered something and then it flew out of my brain as quickly as it came in. Because this is what happens. I’m like, Oh, I could use that and it’s only X amount of dollars. I’m like, Wait, what are we doing? No. Yeah. But for the amount of patterns I know that Lisa has like it makes it makes perfect. Yes. Perfect. Yeah.

Ada
Especially if you have paper patterns and you’ve printed them and all the pieces like I get it I my patterns fit in like a bookshelf. Looking at it right now. And that bookshelf was an accident because we were trying to put up a bookshelf on another spot and then we messed up my sewing room. But it worked out because now I have more storage for patterns. Not on a surface. Anyways back to closing sales. I did go to the Fancy Tiger closing sale at almost the end it wasn’t the last day but they’ve been posting about it for a while. It’s just like harder with the hours that they offered for that sale for me to get over and I was trying to go with my other sewing friend here Gabby and she also couldn’t make it because she had work and so I was like are you looking for anything? So I kept an eye out for dressform parts. They didn’t have any that she was specifically looking for but they had some dress forms. They were very nice quality were they a great deal like were they better than something I thrifted for example like this one. No Deal wise but um you know I understand they were trying to clear space and move stuff so a lot of your fixtures had gone a lot of I saw a man literally walk in and say “I want a sewing machine I heard they’re on sale”, and paid for it, and walk right out like we were quick transactions like that. And then there were a few of us like browsing the store. By the time I made it there most of the fabric was gone. There was a few quilting cottons in different colors and not your neutrals, like very bright colors or very dark colors. And they had some prints they did still have some I think Ruby star society prints too. They had just like a, I want to say a smidge of garment fabrics. They had a few rolls in you know on the wall and they had a few bolts, which I did get some they had some remnants which I did also get one remnant and a lot of trims. So I got a lovely it looks kind of like a knit trim. But it definitely is machine made that I think will go really nicely on the hem of like a sweater or a pullover, maybe like a warmer weather woven. I got some bra elastic and that kind of all that elastic in this nice like icy blue gray color, more gray than blue. And that was it. I was tempted by some patterns but oh no, I did get a pattern. I think I got a pattern for jeans but the rest of the patterns I was like knees are not quite my style OR, or NOT my size. And there were bra the thing that I am very proud of resisting was the bra underwires.

Nicole
Oh

Ada
Because they had quite a few of those and they were like similar price to what I’ve paid for them before but I I did one time on a sale optimistically by many bra kits and many bra supplies and have yet to slowly make my way through them. I’m currently unpicking half of a bra that just did not work with sewing it. So yeah, that that was my experience at the sale. I ended up with some yardage, a remnant and lots of notions, I guess it will called trim and elastics notions. But it was it was actually quicker than I thought because they had gotten down to so little before their move. And I don’t know I felt it. I felt good about it. It wasn’t anything that I wasn’t going to use. And I even asked my sister, because I think I got like, what was left on the bolt. So a little over four years, maybe five of a purple Lavender twill asked my sister was like, Do you want some pants?

Nicole
You’re so generous with your sewing.

Ada
Mostly because I know that she’ll always say yes to pants most of the time. Even the ones I’ve aggregiously like top stitching’s wonky, fits kind of weird. I think I gave her a toile of the Bisque trousers that were an unlined itchy woodl. I was like You must wear tights. Here you go. Wool, pants but yeah, it’s uh, most of that haul has been sitting on my sewing area couch.

Nicole
I can’t have couches in rooms, chairs and couches. I’m a surface. I’m a surface gremlin. I like to cover surfaces with stuff. There’s a chair next to me that has stuff on it.

Ada
Yeah, my whole table is covered and stuff the couch is some you could see the couch right now. It’s still covered in fabric though. And yeah, so it could definitely use some cleaning out in here for sure. But a lot of it has been purchased on sale most of it not at closing sales. But I don’t know we’ll see how Joann says because a la Bed Bath and Beyond I never I A mostly don’t go to Joann’s but B like, if I do I go with a coupon.

Nicole
Yeah, yeah. And it was only the one store. I mean, in the Chicago area, there’s like a dozen of them, you know, and this one was out of the way from where I was. I happened to be nearby. The first time I went, but yeah, I don’t know. So we talked a lot about shopping today, I think maybe that we should a shopping the sales maybe is the title of this episode or something like that. Because, you know, we have our closing sales, but also just I think, you know, just an interesting discussion about shopping habits and, and how it plays into our fabric and sewing practices. But I guess here who, you know, if if you are going to shop, there are some tips that Ada and I have I have a few especially if you’re shopping, closing sales, I think these are our tips. You know, there’s just stuff that we learned about we while we’ve been shopping recently, but for me, I always try to think of you know, tip number one is like beware of the idea that because it’s inexpensive, you need it. Like it’s that whole, or you could not spend any money on something that you don’t need, which is what I think it’s helpful for me to remember. Do I want this because it’s inexpensive? Or do I want this because I want it and it’s something that I need or not even need because this whole sewing practice is not a need for us. Back in the day. You know, you sewed clothes because you needed them and it was cheaper to sew your own clothes. But now it’s none of it’s a need. And that’s okay. I guess my tip number two is look for your staple items when on these like super superduper sales so you don’t end up getting bogged down in like more fabric that you need. And I was thinking of them as like pantry staples, you know, like your threads, your needles, your zippers, your buttons, like these are the types of things that you’re gonna go through more quickly. And you could find a good variety and so pro tip, pro closing sale tip, I guess and actually this came from Michael who was with me. He’s like, why don’t you check the drawers underneath? Because because the thread racks were pretty bare, you know? And I was like, okay, whatever, it’s fine. And I was like, No, I don’t want anything and then open the drawer and just like Jean topstitching thread down there. Just like a few spools of it and you know, they ended up they were 90% off and I’m like well I don’t, I just use thread. I don’t use topstitching thread, I’m like oh, now’s the time. So I’m you know, checking those like nooks and crannies like there’s also the zipper section. Everything that was hung up still was like color that is that would be hard to match like a specific color or like a bright green or bright yellow. But I would look into the bottom of the display and like I kind of just pulled out a handful of what was there to get your your bronze your blacks, your whites, but they had fallen at the bottom. And I was like, oh, people aren’t looking in here. And so you know, I picked out a bunch I found some double sided purse zippers, which I like to use the double sided zippers when I make bags, even tote bags, if I’m making one with a zipper, it’s nice to have like the double option. And when I’ve made like fanny packs, it’s nice to have the double option that we’re you know, brown or black. So those I have spent paid full price for it because they’re they’re a little bit hard to find in store at places. But yeah, like look around the displays if there’s something that you’re really looking for, so check drawers, like look at the zipper stand. And this is really more of a closing sale type of thing when everything looks bare, maybe there’s something that you’re you’re looking for. And so I guess my last tip is like use it as an opportunity to try something new. But don’t decide that you’re going to become a master candle maker and by all the things, because it’s on sale it’s like you know, use it as an entry point to trying something new. And for me that was a couple of bottles of the fragrance oil because I know that my mom still has extra wax and we’ve reusing candles that we’ve bought like the the containers like cleaning them out and reusing them. And then bulky nylon, I have been wanting to try using the bulky nylon in my serger after seeing Ella from Handmade Millennial make really beautiful napkins that were edged with a rolled hem and bulky nylon. So yeah, I found a few colors that were in the drawers and I’m like, Okay, well, I know I bought some bulky nylon full price, like a couple spools to try it. But I’m like, but also, this is like a couple more spools but for pennies, you know, so yeah, yeah. So I guess it’s it’s determined whether you want it because you want it or you want it because it’s inexpensive and you want to go with the former, look for your staple items, your notions, your pantry, staples, and then you know, and then look in places that you might not expect, especially if it’s a closing sale, and use it as an opportunity to try something new. But don’t go don’t go off. It’s to try it. Do you have any tips Ada for when you’re shopping, fabric sales, and then any specific like closing down sale tips.

Ada
I would say I don’t know about you. But I’m a person who sometimes I’m in the mood to dig and other days most of the time I’m not. And sort of like respect that and don’t make yourself dig through something if you are not feeling it, because you’ll be more likely to be like, I it’s cheap. I just want it. For me if I’m shopping now it’s a question of like, what project specifically am I going to use it for? It doesn’t have to be a specific pattern. But let’s say if I’m buying yardage, like, Am I making pants? Am I making a boiler suit out of it? Is it more lightweight? So is it going to be a top is it going to be multiple tops, I just try to at least have some sort of idea what I’m going to use it for when I’m doing that. So I know A how much to proximately by and B that I do have something in mind for it. And it’s not just like, Ooh, cool print or cool fabric. Another thing that I do is I just like think about like, in total, how much would I like to spend today, if at all? Any? If the answer is zero, don’t go to a sale? If the answer is like 20, and you’re going there and everything’s like $50, then you might as well just leave and not tempt yourself some more because they think that can also throw you off. And so it’s just like being conscious of that number in your head and giving yourself a little bit of like an anchor. And then my last tip is to ask yourself, what will happen if I don’t use this fabric like if I or notion or whatever you’re buying? Like, if I bring this home and it ends up sitting in my house, apartment 5-10 years? What What am I gonna do with it in five to 10 years? How will I dispose of it? How will I get rid of it? Sometimes for me, like, I will I’m very prone to the free pile at work. I contribute to it, like I will bring, you know, extra packing paper that I got for free from neighbors and say like, Hey, if anyone needs any more like recycled packing paper, here you go have at it. But then like, let’s say someone puts up a free table or free like piece of furniture I could use I’m all over that stuff. And so the question is like, what will happen? How will you dispose of it if you bring it home? Which I think sometimes, many times actually has now stopped me and made me think okay, well, do I really need this? Do I really need it right now? Some of the times the answer might be I could use it but maybe not right now. And does that mean like revisiting whatever that object is? Or item is later down the road? But yeah, that’s our closing sales and fabric shopping sales, all the sales and kind of take on shopping today.

Nicole
Yeah, it’s just a conversation about shopping. I think. I don’t think about out the act of shopping while I’m shopping, if that makes sense. So, like, I’m just enjoying myself or I’m upset because I don’t want to shop for, you know, a new. I don’t know, toilet. Yes, that is something I had to think about recently. But I think it’s good to discuss, you know, the more we talk about things just in general, the more conscious we are of it. And I love that last tip Ada, like what will happen if you don’t use it? Like, I think I’m gonna incorporate that into my sewing practice as well, I think I get to a point where stuff just accumulates and then I’m like, Alright, I gotta do something with it. It’s like, well, no, okay, maybe if I do a little bit, be a little bit more mindful on the front end, would not have this problem. Right.

Ada
And I think that tip definitely comes from having to clean out and move my parents individually multiple times, dispose of their items, but also, right now I claimed something large from the free pile at work. And I it’s been in my space for about like, two weeks, and I’m debating I tried to see if other friends would use it. Because I really would hate to see it go to waste. But I tried to see if other friends would use it. And they were all like, nope, not right now. And so might go back to the free pile. Just because it’s large and bulky. And I don’t have an immediate use for it. Yeah, yeah. Anyways, thanks for listening this week. Shall we get on to the outro?

Nicole
Yes, ma’am.

Ada
Thank you so much for joining us for this episode of the Asian Sewist Collective podcast. If you like our show, please consider supporting us on Kofi by becoming a one time or monthly supporter or by buying or selling labels. Your financial support helps us with our overhead expenses. The link to our coffee page is ko-fi.com/asiansewistcollective. And you can find the link in our show notes on our website and on our Instagram account. Check us out on Instagram at Asian Sewist Collective That’s one word AsianSewistCollective. You can also help us out by spreading the word and telling your friends. We would also appreciate it if you could rate review and subscribe to this podcast on Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.

Nicole
All of the links and resources mentioned in today’s episode will be in the show notes on our website. That’s AsianSewistCollective.com And we’d love to hear from you. Email us with your questions, comments or even voice messages if you want to be featured on future episodes at AsianSewistCollective@gmail.com Thank you so much to the other members of our collective who made this episode a reality. This is the Asian Sewist Collective podcast and we’ll see you next time.

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